Are You Living The Life Of An Ostrich?
Are You Living The Life Of An Ostrich? It only seems natural to want to avoid difficult situations – BUT – avoiding them doesn’t... Are You Living The Life Of An Ostrich?

Are You Living The Life Of An Ostrich?

It only seems natural to want to avoid difficult situations – BUT – avoiding them doesn’t make them go away. They will be back.

For those of us over the age of fifty we’ve pretty much seen it, been there and done that in every situation. And many of those situations were less than pleasant, but we are still here and the situation is now long gone.

The key to take from this is that no matter how uncomfortable a situation is we need to face them head on. Because then we can rectify the situation, and prevent it from happening again down the road.

In the following article they explain why we need to face up to every emotional situation – pleasant or negative.

Enjoy the read or don’t 🙂

 

Emotional Acceptance: Why Feeling Bad is Good

Avoiding negative emotions seems like a good idea. It isn’t.

According to recent psychological research (by David Barlow, Steven Hayes and others) one of the main causes of many psychological problems is the habit of emotional avoidance. This may seem surprising, because the attempt to avoid negative emotions appears to be a reasonable thing. After all, negative emotions don’t feel good, and they are often linked in our minds to negative events that we want to avoid or forget. Moreover, we are all familiar with the momentary relief that avoidance can provide. If the thought of speaking up upsets me, then I can make myself feel better by deciding not to speak. Indeed, avoidance is an effective solution in the short term. Long term, however, it becomes a bigger problem than whatever was being avoided in the first place. And life, if you’re at all lucky, is a long term proposition.

Avoiding a negative emotion buys you short term gain at the price of long term pain. When you avoid the short term discomfort of a negative emotion, you resemble the person who under stress decides to drink. It ‘works,’ and the next day, when bad feelings come, he drinks again. So far so good, short term. In the long run, however, that person will develop a bigger problem (addiction), in addition to the unresolved issues he had avoided by drinking.

There are several reasons why emotional avoidance is harmful.

First, important goals and pursuits in your life may inherently involve going through some challenging times and situations, and an unwillingness to ‘pay the toll’ for the trip may narrow your life horizons needlessly. Over time, avoidance becomes a…

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Emotional Acceptance: Why Feeling Bad is Good

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