Do You Really Understand Compassion?
Do You Really Understand Compassion? When you think of compassion do you think that someone must be suffering? That someone is going through a... Do You Really Understand Compassion?

Do You Really Understand Compassion?

When you think of compassion do you think that someone must be suffering? That someone is going through a painful event, where they have suffered some form of loss?

Well – MAYBE – that’s not necessarily true.

You see what makes the world such an amazing place is the diversification of all cultures. People from Russia look at things quite differently than people from Brazil, and people from China look at things quite differently than people from the US.

So does that make one place better or worse? I think not – just different. But somehow we fear that difference, and because we don’t know why they are doing what they are doing, we are unsure what to expect. So we immediately retract and protect ourselves with what we do know.

But what if we had compassion for all mankind? What if we didn’t feel the need to judge and compare? What if we could simply accept something as different and receive these differences with open arms?

Well we can – but first we must really understand compassion.

In the following article written by Gary van Warmerdam, he will provide you with an interesting view on compassion.

Compassion

Accepting Life as it Is Without Sorrow or Emotional Reaction

Common definitions of compassion read like the following: a feeling of deep sympathy and sorrow for another who is stricken with misfortune, accompanied by a strong desire to alleviate the suffering. These definitions create the idea that compassion requires us to join another in their misery. Does this really help anyone? We may need a definition of compassion that is more powerful. For true compassion we will have to expand our understanding so we don’t mistakenly create more sorrow from suffering.

Let us consider a definition which does not require us to suffer. What if compassion is simply the active expression of acceptance for the world and people just as they are? It entails a state of mind where there is no judgment about a situation or a person. True compassion is being able to look at the whole world without expectations that it should be any different.

To read the rest of this article please click on the link below:

Compassion

 

Posted by YSF Staff

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