Do You Take Your Feet For Granted?
Do You Take Your Feet For Granted? Think about it for a minute – do you really invest wisely in your feet? Do you... Do You Take Your Feet For Granted?

Do You Take Your Feet For Granted?

Think about it for a minute – do you really invest wisely in your feet? Do you exercise your toes? Do you stretch your ankles? Do you buy quality footwear? Seriously!

Have you ever watched older people waddle down the road or shuffle their feet as they walk? If you have – chances are those people didn’t take care of their feet in their second fifty. No feet to activity – no activity – NOT GOOD!

In any case check out the following article and see what you can do to ensure you remain mobile well into your second fifty.

 

Our Feet After 50: What You Need to Know

By the time we reach age 50, experts say our feet have walked about 75,000 miles —that’s more than three times around the earth. If you’re runners like I am, some of those miles have been on hard surfaces.

And for the sake of style, I wore pointy high-heeled shoes to the office everyday. That’s lot of foot torture, say podiatrists and orthopedic surgeons who deal with women’s foot problems ranging from aching heel pain and bunions to hammer toes and infections.

By the time we reach 50, even if we are healthy and are not over-weight, our feet may begin to complain. If in addition to aging issues, we also may face challenges from chronic conditions such as diabetes or obesity, then our feet (and knees) can give us real trouble.

In my circle of 60-something friends, our feet are a regular topic of conversation. Two of us have are recovering from recent foot surgery to alleviate pain.

The good news is that active older women are seeking treatment before the pain causes them to lose mobility. And new technologies are allowing faster recovery from foot surgery and other treatments.

“My bunion was making it painful to walk,” said 67-year-old Susan J., a friend of mine. “I’ve had the surgery and in two months I expect to be back to my routine.” That routine includes traveling with her husband and serious gardening around her expansive yard.

Dr. Jay Crary, an orthopedic surgeon at Rebound in Vancouver, Wash. thinks it’s great that baby boomers generally are remaining active as we age.

“But they have to accept that bodies change as we get older,” said Crary, who does about 400 surgeries a year. “Maybe you could run four miles every day at age 35. At 55 your soft tissue is less elastic, tendons can tear.”

This week, I had my feet measured by a professional at a shoe store geared to older women. Surprise, my feet are a size larger than they were 10 years ago. For the first time in my life, I invested more than $100 in a new pair of running shoes — offering extra arch support and a wider design. I’m hoping the foot pain in the ball of my right foot big toe joint eases up and the heel pain in my left foot subsides. No way am I cutting back on the workout.

In addition to proper foot wear, Dr. Crary recommends that his older patients adjust their exercise routine to include biking or other cross-training workouts to eliminate foot stress.

“As we age, we may need…

To read more click on the link below:

Our Feet After 50: What You Need to Know

 

Posted by YSF STAFF

admin