If You Look Back At Your Negative Results, What Effort Did You Really Put Forth?
If You Look Back At Your Negative Results, What Effort Did You Really Put Forth? Sure it’s easier to learn anything that is fun... If You Look Back At Your Negative Results, What Effort Did You Really Put Forth?

If You Look Back At Your Negative Results, What Effort Did You Really Put Forth?

Sure it’s easier to learn anything that is fun (parent’s take heed), but how many of your attempted past failures were more likely attached to a lack of focus, or a lack of effort, than they were attached to your lack of ability?

I venture to guess most. Well, maybe a bit was determined by the teacher, but even a poor teacher can’t slow down a student with a self driven love for what they are doing.

This is why we must reevaluate who we are – because far to often our parents pushed us into something, because others had told them this was good for us, when in fact we had no interest what-so-ever in doing it. End result, a belief that we couldn’t do this.

Now that doesn’t mean every child would have been better off with a video game controller in their hand (because video games are entertaining and fun – therefore easy). What I’m saying is that if we choose to do something we have a desire to learn, chances are a lot better we will succeed. Now this isn’t an opportunity to blame your lack of – on your parents, this is an opportunity for you to know, you can do whatever you like so long as you are willing to put in the effort to attain the level of competence you desire.

Which means you can learn to play guitar, learn a new language, program a computer or bake a cake.

In the following article from the Huffington Post, written by Ronna Benjamin, Ronna takes you on a nice journey pertaining to your potential.

 

How Hard Could It Be To Learn A New Language After 50?

This article was originally published on Better After 50.

Last week I took my first Spanish lesson. Apparently, I am as qualified today as I was at my last language lesson almost 40 years ago. Surely, when I travel to Costa Rica this winter, I’ll be able to dazzle the kids with my ability to converse with the locals.

It turns out that there really is nothing holding us back after 50- there is no critical period for second-language learning, “no biologically determined constraint on language-learning capacity that emerges at a particular age, nor any maturational process which requires that older language learners function differently than younger language learners.”

According to AARP, older learners have some advantages: they are not only motivated to learn, but they have acquired study strategies, mnemonic devices, literacy skills, and other resources to make learning easier (like a private tutor that comes to the house.) Plus, learning a new language is great for the brain- it actually develops new neural pathways, makes new connections, adds flexibility. And who among us couldn’t use a few new neural pathways?…

To read the rest of this article please click on the link below:

How Hard Could It Be To Learn A New Language After Fifty?

 

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