Learning Something New After 50 Isn’t As Hard As You Think
Learning Something New After 50 Isn’t As Hard As You Think It’s so ridiculous the way we were taught, that we could only learn... Learning Something New After 50 Isn’t As Hard As You Think

Learning Something New After 50 Isn’t As Hard As You Think

It’s so ridiculous the way we were taught, that we could only learn up to a certain age and after that it only became harder and harder. Of course anything that’s not being used will require a little ramping up time, but once it gets going and you are back in the grove, things appear to happen more naturally.

And when do you need to start ramping up? Right now, because there’s no time like the present to show yourself the love and respect you deserve and to help you get going just continue on reading and Maria Brilak will help get you on the right track.

 

8 Ways to Train Your Brain to Learn Faster and Remember More

By Maria Brilaki

You go to the gym to train your muscles. You run outside or go for hikes to train your endurance. Or, maybe you do neither of those, but still wish you exercised more. Well, here is how to train one of the most important parts of your body: your brain.

When you train your brain, you will:

Avoid embarrassing situations: you remember his face, but what was his name?
Be a faster learner in all sorts of different skills: hello promotion, here I come!
Avoid diseases that hit as you get older: no, thanks Alzheimer’s; you and I are not just a good fit.
So how do you train your brain to learn faster and remember more?

1. Work your memory.

Twyla Tharp, a NYC-based renowned choreographer has come up with the following memory workout: when she watches one of her performances, she tries to remember the first twelve to fourteen corrections she wants to discuss with her cast without writing them down. If you think this is anything less than a feat, then think again. In her book The Creative Habit she says that most people cannot remember more than three.

The practice of both remembering events or things and then discussing them with others has actually been supported by brain fitness studies. Memory activities that engage all levels of brain operation—receiving, remembering and thinking—help to improve the function of the brain.

Now, you may not have dancers to correct, but you may be required to give feedback on a presentation, or your friends may ask you what interesting things you saw at the museum. These are great opportunities to practically train your brain by flexing your memory muscles.

What is the simplest way to help yourself remember what you see? Repetition.

For example, say you just met someone new.

“Hi, my name is George”

Don’t just respond with, “Nice to meet you”. Instead, say, “Nice to meet you George.” Got it? Good.

2. Do something different repeatedly.

By actually doing something new over and over again, your brain wires new pathways that help you do this new thing better and faster.

Think back to when you were three years old. You surely were strong enough to hold a knife and a fork just fine. Yet, when you were eating all by yourself, you were creating a mess. It was not a matter of strength, you see. It was a matter of cultivating more and better neural pathways that would help you eat by yourself just like an adult does. And guess what? With enough repetition you made that happen!

But how does this apply to your life right now…

To read the rest of this article please follow the link below:

8 Ways to Train Your Brain to Learn Faster and Remember More

 

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